Foreign Minister Kono to Visit Mongolia

June 14, 2019
Japanese

  1. 1. Mr. Taro Kono, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Japan, will visit Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, from June 15 to June 17. This will be the first visit to Mongolia by a Japanese Foreign Minister in nine years.

    2. During the visit, Foreign Minister Kono will hold a Foreign Ministers’ Meeting with H.E. Mr. Damdin Tsogtbaatar, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Mongolia. In addition, Foreign Minister Kono is scheduled to pay a courtesy call on H.E. Mr. Khaltmaa Battulga, President of Mongolia, and H.E. Mr. Ukhnaa Khurelsukh, Prime Minister of Mongolia, among other appointments, and participate in a luncheon hosted by the Mongolia-Japan Parliamentary Friendship Association.

    3. In addition, Foreign Minister Kono will attend the opening ceremony of Mongolia’s first university hospital, the Mongolia-Japan Teaching Hospital, which was established through Japan’s official grant assistance. He is also scheduled to offer flowers at the “Memorial Monument for Deceased Japanese,” a memorial monument for Japanese nationals who died during detainment after the Second World War.

    (Reference 1) Schedule of Minister Kono’s Visit

    June 15 PM Depart Narita
     Arrive in Ulaanbaatar
    17 AM Depart Ulaanbaatar
     Arrive at Narita

    (Reference 2) Mongolia-Japan Teaching Hospital (Overview)
    At the National Medical University of Mongolia (Ulaanbaatar City), the only medical national university in Mongolia, Japan's official grant assistance (approximately 8 billion yen) will be used to establish Mongolia's first university hospital and support the acquisition of necessary equipment.
    It is expected to establish a high quality training system and contribute to improve the quality of medical services in Mongolia.

    (Reference 3) Memorial Monument for Deceased Japanese (Overview)
    Following the Second World War, approximately 14,000 of the Japanese nationals detained in Siberia were transferred to the People's Republic of Mongolia (present-day Mongolia) from 1945 to 1947, and approximately 1,700 died in Mongolia. In October 2001, a monument was erected on the hill of Dambadarjaa, in the northern part of Ulaanbaatar City, one of the former burial grounds.