(* This is a provisional translation by an external company for reference purpose only. The original text is in Japanese.)

Press Conference by Minister for Foreign Affairs Katsuya Okada

Date: Friday, September 18, 2009, 5:45 p.m.
Place: Briefing Room, Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Main topics:

  1. Opening Statements
    • (1) Basic Policy regarding Press Conferences by the Minister for Foreign Affairs
    • (2) Attendance in the General Assembly of the UN and Other Conferences
    • (3) Meeting with Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs of the United States Dr. Kurt Campbell
  2. Meeting with Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs of the United States Dr. Kurt Campbell
  3. Orders for an Investigation into the Issue of the Secret Pacts
  4. The Information Transmission Structure of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (The Opening Up of Press Conferences, the Discontinuation of the Vice-Ministers' Press Conferences, and Others)
  5. Appointment of Mr. Muneo Suzuki as a Chairman of the House of Representative Committee on Foreign Affairs
  6. The Issue of the Relocation of the US Military Facility
  7. The North Korean Abduction Issue
  8. Attendance in the General Assembly of the UN and Other Conferences
  9. Objections to the Preemptive Use of Nuclear Weapons
  10. Ministerial Committee on Global Warming

1. Opening Statements

(1) Basic Policy regarding Press Conferences by the Minister for Foreign Affairs

Minister:
I would like to say three things firstly. I have already talked a little about this before, but I would like to explain the basic policy regarding the press conferences by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In principle, I plan to hold this press conference twice a week. In the past, while the Diet was in session I believe the press conference usually took place after Cabinet Meetings. However, I would like to hold a press conference at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs at least once a week, and if possible, twice a week. However, that will depend on how much time I have and there may be cases when one of the press conferences will be a doorstepping talk -- but I do plan to hold a press conference twice a week including these instances. Additionally, these press conferences will be open, in principle, not only to media organizations that are members of the press club in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, but to all media. Specifically speaking, this will include members of the Japan Newspaper Publishers & Editors Association (Nihon Shinbun Kyokai, NSK), the National Association of Commercial Broadcasters in Japan (NAB), the Japan Magazine Publishers Association (JMPA), the Internet News Association of Japan, the Foreign Correspondents' Club of Japan (FCCJ), and those who hold a Foreign Press Registration Card. Regarding freelance journalists, I would also like to include journalists who regularly provide articles to the aforementioned media organizations. By having these journalists register in advance, I would like to have all journalists, in principle, able to attend the press conferences.

(2) Attendance in the General Assembly of the UN and Other Conferences

Minister:
Second, regarding my attendance to the General Assembly of the UN and other conferences, the schedule is almost set. I will depart from Narita on Monday, September 21 to go to New York. I am scheduled to hold a Japan-US Foreign Ministers' Meeting, and participate in the Japan-US-Australia Trilateral Strategic Dialogue, among other meetings, so I will leave Japan a little early. Other meetings, including bilateral meetings, are currently being arranged, and I just had a telephone conference with Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs of the UK David Miliband, although it was more a greeting rather than a telephone conference. I would like to vigorously pursue other bilateral meetings. Additionally, there will be a G8 Foreign Ministers' Meeting and various other meetings. Of course, I will also be in attendance at the UN General Assembly when Prime Minister Hatoyama gives his speech and I will attend bilateral summit meetings if necessary. My first overseas trip will be a long one and I will be back in Japan on the evening of Saturday, September 26.

Related Information (The 64th Session of the United Nations General Assembly)

(3) Meeting with Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs of the United States Dr. Kurt Campbell

Minister:
Third, Dr. Kurt Campbell, Assistant Secretary of State of the United States is visiting Japan and I met with him today. We exchanged opinions on a broad range of subjects for about 45 minutes. The end was a little rushed because the Diet was about to start, but I stated that I was deeply moved to be able to meet with Assistant Secretary of State Campbell, who is an old friend of mine, and that I was looking forward to my meeting with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. I also stated that I would like to make efforts so that the Japan-US Alliance can be sustainable even after 30 or 50 years and deepened further. Additionally, I said that I would make thorough preparations for President Obama's visit to Japan, and that this meeting with Assistant Secretary of State Campbell was the first step in those preparations.

Assistant Secretary of State Campbell stated that he was looking forward to tackling issues of the 21st century through close cooperation between Japan and the US and that US Ambassador to Japan John Roos is the person in whom President Obama places the most trust. I conveyed to him that there were three points that I planned to focus my efforts on for the time being. These three points are as I stated in the press conference at the time of my appointment as Minister for Foreign Affairs. I stated that I would like to focus my efforts on the issue of the realignment of US forces in Japan, assistance for the reconstruction of Afghanistan and Pakistan, and the global warming issue, in consideration of COP15 coming up in December. Additionally, I stated that I had already issued orders to the Vice-Minister for Foreign Affairs to clear up the issue of the secret pacts. I believe we were able to exchange extremely meaningful and varied opinions.

Related Information (Japan-U.S. Relations)

2. Meeting with Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs of the United States Dr. Kurt Campbell

Question:
Regarding your meeting with Assistant Secretary Campbell, in a press conference with the media, he made a statement to the effect that he was prepared to hold fresh discussions regarding the US forces in Japan. What opinions were exchanged on this matter during your meeting with him today?

Minister:
While he stated today that in principle we would proceed as originally agreed upon, I believe that the way he said it left room for negotiation.

Question:
On hearing this, in your opinion, do you think that moving forward there is a lot of room for negotiation or that you must swiftly conduct talks?

Minister:
Putting the negotiations aside, what I told him was that in Okinawa there are four single-seat constituencies and that those who were elected in those constituencies, whether from the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) or the Social Democratic Party, have been clearly stating that they are against the relocation from Futenma to Henoko. Additionally, I stated that we are a coalition government. I also stated that regarding the issue of Futenma Air Station, while the DPJ did not refer to it in its manifesto, it has made various statements about the issue. I explained the political circumstances in Japan thus.

Question:
How did Assistant Secretary Campbell express his view regarding what you said about the secret pacts issue?

Minister:
When I brought the subject up, I explained that the issue arose when documents that were disclosed in the US showed a discrepancy with Japan's explanations on the matter, and that basically the issue would not cause trouble to the US side.

Question:
Did Assistant Secretary Campbell have any opinions or comments regarding this?

Minister:
There was nothing in particular, just that he understood that it was something that took place in the 1950s and 1960s and that it would not have any effect on future Japan-US relations.

Question:
Was there any exchange of opinions regarding North Korea with Assistant Secretary Campbell? If so, would you please let us know what was talked?

Minister:
We did not discuss the North Korean issues today as time was limited.

Question:
Was there any talk about Japan's refueling activities that Japan is conducting in the Indian Ocean during your talk with Assistant Secretary Campbell?

Minister:
No, there was not. We did touch on reconstruction assistance in Afghanistan and Pakistan, but we did not talk about fuel replenishment activities to vessels in the Indian Ocean.

Question: As you mentioned the realignment of US forces in Japan is one of the issues you want to tackle with, did you use any expression to the effect that you are clearly against the original plan?

Minister: I stated that it was an issue for the two countries to fully discuss, explaining the related situation in Japan.

Question:
During your talk with Assistant Secretary Campbell, did you discuss assistance for the reconstruction of Afghanistan and Pakistan?

Minister:
We agreed on the importance of reconstruction assistance. There was talk of -- I do not recall the exact wording, but he mentioned high regard for Japan's assistance to date. I believe he was referring to Japan's provision of salaries for police forces and the various assistance projects for Afghanistan conducted through the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA).

Related Information (Japan-U.S. Security Arrangements)

3. Orders for an Investigation into the Issue of the Secret Pacts

Question:
Regarding the secret pacts on nuclear weapons, your orders to the Vice-Minister to conduct an investigation include not only the secret pacts on the introduction of nuclear weapons which was the original issue, but also the other three secret agreements. Please tell us your intentions and thoughts on investigating the four secret pacts together.

Minister:
Basically, it is these four pacts that have been taken up in the news, and since we are going to conduct an investigation, I thought that we might as well look thoroughly into all four of them. In reality, it is really two not four -- we can categorize them into two groups -- one related to the return of Okinawa and one related to the revision of the Japan-US Security Treaty.

Since you have brought up the subject, I would like to speak a little about this. I have talked about this previously, but there are 2,694 files related to the Japan-US Security Treaty to be exact, and 571 files related to the return of Okinawa. Additionally, there are about 400 files at the Japanese embassy in the US, documents from the time in question that are still at the embassy. These will be the target of the investigation.

In order to conduct this investigation, we will need considerable human resources. I will have staff at the Japanese embassy in the US look at the documents there, but the other files themselves are a huge amount. Therefore, an investigation team will be launched under the Vice-Minister on September 25. Of course, the investigation will already be underway before the official launch of the investigation team. I decided in discussion with the Vice-Minister to have Assistant Vice-Minister for Crisis Management Mitsuru Kitano take charge of the total investigation. In total, I plan to have about 14-15 people on the investigation team. Of these members, some will be staff called back from diplomatic missions overseas temporarily in order to take part in the investigation.

Question:
As a separate issue from whether these secret pacts exist or not, I believe there is the issue of whether they are still valid. I believe that there are ways to quickly obtain the answer to this by asking the US side. For example, I think that there are many channels through which you could confirm whether the US side considers these secret pacts between the Japan and the US "alive" or still in effect, such as when you meet with Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. What is your opinion on this?

Minister:
I believe right now it is important to uncover whether the secret pacts exist rather than whether they are still effective. I think it is important that Japan conduct a thorough investigation and disclose information, not ask the US side.

Question:
Regarding the issue of the introduction of nuclear weapons, you stated that it is more important right now to find out whether the secret pacts exist rather than whether they are still effective. However, I believe that whether these pacts are still in effect is a very important issue. If the US still recognizes them to be in effect, wouldn't that conflict with the Three Non-nuclear Principles, which are a national policy? If they are no longer effective, I believe them to be an incident of the past. What is your opinion on this?

Minister:
I believe that confirming the existence of the secret pacts comes before finding out whether they are still in effect. I cannot understand why you are talking about whether they are in effect or not before confirming their existence. First we must clear up the matter of their existence. To discuss other matters while doing this may make us lose our grip on the initial issue. So first we must uncover the truth of the existence of the secret pacts and disclose information to the public, and then decide what to do based on our findings.

Question:
Regarding the "truth" you mentioned, if, as a result of the investigation, the existence of the pacts is confirmed, it would conflict with the statements of past Ministry of Foreign Affairs officials who answered that the secret pacts do not exist. Do you plan to hold them to account?

Minister:
Regarding this matter, I cannot really say anything until I have seen the results of the investigation. However, I believe that it is a little harsh to expect Ministry of Foreign Affairs officials to answer "they exist" while the Prime Minister or Minister for Foreign Affairs deny it.

Related Information (Nuclear Disarmament and Non-Proliferation)

4. The Information Transmission Structure of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (The Opening Up of Press Conferences, the Discontinuation of the Vice-Ministers' Press Conferences, and Others)

Question:
You stated that you will open up the press conferences to all media outlets. From my investigations, the current situation is that at ministries other than the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry, freelance journalists such as I basically cannot attend Ministers' press conferences. Even if they are allowed to attend, it is as an observer and they cannot ask questions. As a Minister who just announced a policy to open up your press conferences at this time, what is your opinion on these closed conditions?

Minister:
I believe that each Ministry has its own way of thinking as does each Minister. I first opened up the Democratic Party of Japan's press conferences when I was -- I cannot recall if it was when I was Deputy Secretary General or Chair of the Policy Research Committee. As I become Secretary General and President of the DPJ, the scope of openness widened. If I were Minister of all the ministries, all the press conferences would be open, but of course, that is not a possibility. If the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry open up their press conferences and there is no trouble, I believe that trend will spread. In principle, this is something that each ministry and Minister will decide on.

Question:
In relation to the press conferences, since Cabinet Meetings play an extremely large role in the movements of Japan, the press club believes that press conferences should be held right after the Cabinet Meetings. Considering the 12 o'clock news or the evening newspaper, I was surprised that a person in a position as important as the Minister for Foreign Affairs will not hold press conferences after the Cabinet Meetings. You have reiterated your policy on press conferences today. Is there room to consider which way is the best for all of us or will you proceed with things in the way you have decided?

Minister:
I plan to basically follow this policy. This is not to say that there will not be any press conferences after the Cabinet Meetings. However, I stated that I would like to hold a press conference at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs at least once a week because there is limited time after a Cabinet Meeting as the Diet will begin, and I believe that a press conference held at such a time would not be worth it. I believe that a press conference should be an opportunity where I could properly receive questions from the press and answer them conscientiously. A press conference held right after a Cabinet Meeting may have some news value, however, diplomatic issues are only a fraction of the agenda at Cabinet Meetings. Therefore in principle I believe I should come back to the ministry and hold press conferences in the briefing room here. When considering this, the timing may be limited when you consider factors such as the Diet schedule. Of course, today we are starting at this hour, but if other options that do not coincide with the Diet schedule are available, I would be willing to consider them. Additionally, press conferences held after Cabinet Meetings tend to take place at the Diet building. In such cases, even if the press conferences are open, in reality there are many procedures needed to enter the Diet building and this therefore would interfere with the openness of the press conferences. That is why I proposed this method. If you have different views to my explanation, please state them. My plan is to open the press conferences so as to have as many people as possible attend them directly and cater to the public's right to know.

Question:
On the subject of the press conferences that has just come up, as representative of the Press Club, I have exchanges with the staff of the Press Division. Today we were told almost unilaterally that the press conference would be held in the evening. We did not really know your intentions and, as was just mentioned, commercial broadcasters reserve the evening for their main news and there are also issues about time. Of course you have your thoughts and there must be requests from our side that cannot be accommodated. Therefore, I would like to propose that we put our heads together to come up with a solution and make thorough adjustments. Now that we know your intentions, please let us discuss with you how to improve the situation.

Minister:
Regarding this situation, I heard that you gathered today to exchange opinions. If you have consolidated your opinions I would like to hear them. However, while there are factors such as the time of the news to consider, on the other hand we must consider the time of the Diet session and in order to hold a press conference before this time, it would end up being before the Diet session as it originally was. This would limit the time for the press conferences, so is this really good? As I stated earlier, I would also like to hear your opinions on the situation where only certain people can attend the press conferences. In principle, I think that this time slot may be the only one available, at least once a week.

Question:
The press conferences of the Japanese Ambassador to the US and the Japanese Ambassador to the UN were cancelled suddenly. At the Chief Cabinet Secretary's press conference I heard that you stated that there was no harm in having these press conferences and they were reinstated. What were the circumstances behind the cancellation?

Minister:
I do not know how they were cancelled. I did not instruct such a thing. However, given that the policy not to hold press conferences by Vice-Ministers in principle was announced, the Ambassadors may have taken preventative measures under these circumstances where things have not yet officially been decided. I have conveyed to Ambassadors that they were ambassadors who have been appointed to represent Japan, so the press conferences should and must take place. While we are on the subject, regarding the press secretaries, traditionally, the press secretaries' press conferences are held to represent the Ministry as a whole and therefore, I plan to have these continued without change. In this sense, the Vice-Ministers' press conferences will be discontinued. This is a government policy. However, in the form of a round-table talk, these would be the same as holding group interviews and I do not see any problem with this.

Question:
You mentioned the Ambassadors' press conferences, but as is symbolized by this issue, bureaucrats hold their own opinions and responsibilities and play a role in diplomacy. When we make decisions whether to report something, it is not only whether a person is a bureaucrat, but also what he said that we take into consideration. In other words, we do not report a statement just because the Minister for Foreign Affairs made it, and we don't avoid reporting a statement just because a Vice-Minister made it. There are cases where we do not report a Minister's statement and cases where we report a statement even if it was made by a Vice-Minister. However the Government's policy, or should I say the Ministry of Foreign Affairs' policy is that statements made by bureaucrats will not be made public just because they are bureaucrats and Vice-Ministers will not be allowed to make statements just because they are Vice-Ministers. That would result in an atmosphere within the ministry that criticism against politicians will not be tolerated and I believe that this is a "bureaucratic approach" in the negative sense that it is generally used. At times we request interviews with Vice-Ministers to ask their opinions. I believe this will be prohibited as well. I do not understand the reason for this. Would you please explain it?

Minister:
There was a discussion at today's Cabinet Meeting on what the specific limitations should be and it was decided that the Chief Cabinet Secretary would announce a standard again so I would like to wait for that. However, Vice-Ministers work below Ministers and State Secretaries. I believe that it is sufficient for those who have more responsibility to firmly make statements.

Question:
It is not a matter of all or nothing. Vice-Ministers have their own thoughts on their work and we want to hear their opinions as well. We take it as a restriction on freedom of press for a Minister to make a decision to give orders to Vice-Ministers not to make any statements just because they are in a position that supplements the Minister's position. Of course, Vice-Ministers are subordinates of Ministers so if they are told not to speak, they cannot. We would like you to reconsider this.

Minister:
In order to check facts, there are opportunities to hold round-table discussions so you can ask at those opportunities. Regarding policies and final opinions, this should be done by politicians. That is the policy of our Cabinet.

Question:
We have the right or a responsibility to the public to hear responsible statements made in public, not only regarding political issues. Therefore, we ask questions to various politicians as well as Vice-Ministers and others.

Minister:
This is a difference of opinions. In England as well, statements by bureaucrats are limited.

Question:
You say you want to speak actively as a politician. Yet looking at this paper that you have handed out, your press conferences will be held twice a week. They have been held twice a week up until now as well so there is no increase in opportunities to speak. While you say you want to make things open, in actuality you are decreasing the number of opportunities for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to disseminate information.

Minister:
What do you mean by decreasing?

Question:
Up until now the Minister has held press conferences twice a week and in addition to that, there were the Vice-Minister's press conferences. However, the Vice-Minister's press conferences have been discontinued and the number of the Minister's press conferences has not increased. Even on the issue of time, our opinions are not being considered.

Minister:
Please ask questions after having confirmed facts. The Vice-Minister's press conferences have been discontinued but there will be more press conferences by the State Secretaries.

Question:
The State Secretaries will hold press conferences instead of the Vice-Minister?

Minister:
The number of press conferences by the State Secretaries will be increased.

Question:
Related to the matter of interviews, today was the day of the Vice-Minister's regular round-table, but it was cancelled as well as the regular round-table of the Director-General of the International Cooperation Bureau. There were other meetings that were cancelled as well. Did you give instructions not to hold these meetings?

Minister:
I did not. This is the first I have heard of this matter.

5. Appointment of Mr. Muneo Suzuki as a Chairman of the House of Representative Committee on Foreign Affairs

Question:
Today, concerning the appointment of Mr. Suzuki Muneo, President of New Party DAICHI, as a new Chairman of the House of Representatives Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) complained that there was no precedent of appointing a person on trial for bribery to an official Diet post. How do you take this?

Minister:
There may be various opinions, but the appointment was approved by the DPJ, and was already made official. It is true that the LDP expressed opposition to it.

Question:
Mr. Suzuki accused some senior Foreign Ministry officials by their real names. What do you think of having that person in the position of the Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee? Mr. Suzuki has expressed his intention to investigate the issues of secret pacts and confidential diplomatic funds. Will the Ministry of Foreign Affairs cooperate with him in all aspects?

Minister:
Since the appointment of the Chairman is decided by the Committee members, I should refrain from commenting on this. The party approved the appointment. Mr. Suzuki is making various statements, but I cannot tell for certain whether he is saying these things as a Chairman or as a politician. Naturally, I will cooperate on matters that he tackles within the scope of the Chairman's authority.

6. The Issue of the Relocation of the US Military Facility

Question:
Minister of Defense Kitazawa expressed his opinion at a press conference that a relocation of Futenma Air Station to outside the prefecture or outside the country may be difficult in reality. What is your opinion on this?

Minister:
Since there will be various negotiations in the future, I feel it may be slightly inappropriate to make this sort of statement in the beginning without coordination within the government.

Question:
I would like to ask about the realignment of the US forces. In interviews with various media, you answered that one aim would be to make a decision by the end of the year. What would be included in this decision? Does this mean a decision to allocate budget relating to construction or a decision to decide on an alternative relocation venue other than Henoko by the end of the year?

Minister:
Since this concerns another party, we will not know until the actual negotiations start.

Question:
What would this decision be for?

Minister:
Since there will be discussion about the budget within this year and I believe that allocating a budget means an intention to move forward as originally planned, I will answer that to make a decision on whether we do so or not by the end of the year would be one aim.

Related Information (Japan-U.S. Security Arrangements)

7. The North Korean Abduction Issue

Question:
I would like to ask about the abduction issue. Mr. Hiroshi Nakai was appointed Minister of State for the Abduction Issue in the Hatoyama Cabinet. What is the demarcation of roles with the Minister for Foreign Affairs? North Korean Ambassador for Japan-North Korea Normalization Talks Song Il-ho has told the Japanese media that the standards for the resolution of the abduction issue should be discussed and adjusted. What is your opinion on the benchmark for the resolution of the abduction issue?

Minister:
I am not aware of what is behind North Korea's statement, so I am not prepared to say anything in particular at this time. I plan to communicate closely with Mr. Nakai and work in cooperation with him. Regarding Japan's Minister of State for the Abduction Issue, this position has been here from before so basically I plan to follow the separation of roles as it was from before.

Related Information (Abduction Cases of Japanese Nationals)

8. Attendance in the General Assembly of the UN and Other Conferences

Question:
Regarding the international conferences in New York, I believe that there are many things you will appeal to the international community as part of the new administration. Is there anything in particular that you would like to emphasize?

Minister:
That would depend on who I am talking to. However, I gave three points to focus on for the time being, and of these, the global warming issue and reconstruction assistance for Afghanistan and Pakistan are global issues. Therefore, I would like to emphasize these points. Other than that, I believe that I will focus on different bilateral issues depending on who I am talking to.

Question:
The US will participate in the Conference on Facilitating the Entry into Force of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the first time in ten years. What will Japan stress at the conference?

Minister:
The participation of the US in the Conference on the CTBT is very meaningful. I myself have a great deal of interest in the nuclear weapons issue and have taken action for this matter. There was also President Obama's speech in Prague. I would like to convey what specific actions the world should take in order to eliminate nuclear weapons.

Question:
At the General Assembly of the UN, I believe the issue of reforming the UN Security Council will be a very important issue. Up until now, Japanese diplomacy has had the aim of allowing Japan to become a permanent member of the UN Security Council. How do you plan to approach the subject of the reform of the UN Security Council?

Minister:
It has only been two days since my appointment as Minister for Foreign Affairs. So I have not yet discussed which opportunities to take for the realization of a reform of the UN Security Council. However, I believe it is only natural for Japan to become a permanent member, and that this is in Japan's national interest. Therefore, I will make efforts toward this.

Related Information (The 64th Session of the United Nations General Assembly)

9. Objections to the Preemptive Use of Nuclear Weapons

Question:
You stated your opinion in a previous press conference that the preemptive use of nuclear weapons is not acceptable. Did this topic come up during your talk with Assistant Secretary Campbell? Additionally, if you have future plans to bring this up within the agenda for discussion between the two governments, what would be the timing for this?

Minister:
It did not come up today. I believe it is a matter of prioritization in a situation where there are a variety of issues. At the moment I am paying attention to the report by the Hon Gareth Evans AO and Ms. Yoriko Kawaguchi, co-chairs of the International Commission on Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament, which will be announced in Hiroshima. I believe that what is said in the report on the preemptive use of nuclear weapons will create opportunities to discuss the matter.

Related Information (Nuclear Disarmament and Non-Proliferation)

10. Ministerial Committee on Global Warming

Question:
I believe there will be a meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Global Warming on Sunday, September 20. What will be discussed there and what will your position be on this matter?

Minister:
I have only just received notice of the meeting and I do not know what the theme will be. The position of the DPJ itself has already been established and made clear by Prime Minister Hatoyama as President of the DPJ. He stated clearly that the goal would be a 25% reduction from the 1990 greenhouse gas emissions level by 2020. I suppose that the discussion will be centered around what actions should be taken at what time on this premise. All I can say is that we must firmly do what is decided upon. As Chair of the Global Warming Countermeasures Headquarters at the DPJ, I have responsibly taken action on this matter, and I would like to emphasize that I will continue to do so.

Related Information (Climate Change)


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