Press Conference 14 September 2001

  1. Question on the position of the Government of Japan concerning support for countermeasures by the United States of America against terrorism
  2. Questions on security measures in Japan
  3. Questions in regard to the situation of former President Alberto Fujimori of the Republic of Peru
  4. Questions concerning immigration measures
  5. Questions concerning travel advisory warnings

  1. Question on the position of the Government of Japan concerning support for countermeasures by the United States of America against terrorism

    Deputy Press Secretary Chikahito Harada: Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen. I have no announcements to make this afternoon, and thus I would be happy to answer any questions that you might have.

    Q: Japan is a key ally of the United States and Prime Minister Koizumi has already declared that he will support retaliatory acts by the United States. I wonder, in light of the Japanese Constitution, is Japan ready to make some modifications to the Constitution to support the United States?

    Mr. Harada: First of all, yesterday, Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi had a telephone conversation with President George W. Bush of the United States of America. In that conversation, Prime Minister Koizumi told President Bush that he shares the US President's recognition that the terrorist attacks this week in the United States are a challenge to freedom, peace and democracy, and Japan strongly supports the US position to fight against terrorism with firm resolve and we are ready to extend necessary assistance and cooperation.

    As to your question, I think it is premature at this stage to make a comment on what kind of assistance or cooperation would be required when the United States takes measures against these terrorist attacks, since we do not know what actions will be taken by the US side nor what kind of assistance or cooperation will be required. Nonetheless, when we consider our assistance and cooperation we will do so within the framework of our Constitution.

    Related Information (Japan's Measures in Response to the Terrorist Attacks in the United States)
  2. Questions on security measures in Japan

    Q: I have a couple of questions, one of which relates to these terrorist attacks. Is Japan reviewing or revising its core measures to prevent terrorism in this country? Second, a related question, apparently the US State Department had issued a warning for US bases and military personnel and nationals in Japan last week, but according to Japanese media reports that warning was not relayed to the Foreign Minister and the Prime Minister. Can you comment on that?

    Mr. Harada: As you know, a meeting of the National Security Council was held and Prime Minister Koizumi instructed all the ministries and agencies concerned to consider necessary measures related to terrorism. I believe these ministries and agencies are now working on that. Concerning your second question, we did receive information last week, and the police took the appropriate measures to reinforce the security arrangements for US installations and facilities. Although the report to Minister for Foreign Affairs Makiko Tanaka was not made immediately, the Director-General in charge made the judgment to take the necessary measures. Afterwards, however, Foreign Minister Tanaka did receive a report.

    Q: In regard to the security warning issued last week, what is the level of the security situation in Japan right now? There is some confusion about this warning; was it to do with the terrorist attacks in the United States or not?

    Mr. Harada: As I stated, the warning was in relation to the security of US installations and facilities in Japan, such as US military bases or the Embassy of the United States of America--the warning did not concern the security of Japan as a whole. I do not think the security level in Japan was raised or anything of that kind. I know the security level at US military facilities had been raised to the highest level, and lowered at a later date. However, you will have to check with the US Embassy about the details.

    Related Information (Japan's Measures in Response to the Terrorist Attacks in the United States)
  3. Questions in regard to the situation of former President Alberto Fujimori of the Republic of Peru

    Q: On a different issue, a judge in Peru has issued an international arrest warrant for Alberto Fujimori. I am wondering if you can comment on whether Japan will consider returning Fujimori to Peru?

    Mr. Harada: We are aware of that development, but since this is a domestic procedure of the Republic of Peru we do not have a specific comment on that. However, if you are asking about the extradition of former Peruvian President Alberto Fujimori, I think you know our position, which is that we will deal with that issue in accordance with our rules and regulations.

    Q: I just want to confirm this, have the Peruvian authorities contacted Japan in regard to this issue of the international arrest warrant?

    Mr. Harada: I have not had any information that we received contact in relation to the arrest warrant.

    Q: So you have not been in contact with the Peruvian government at all, or you are in contact in some way?

    Mr. Harada: To my knowledge, we have not had any contact from the Peruvian side on the arrest warrant.

    Q: If you do receive contact from the Peruvian side, asking for the cooperation of the Japanese Government, could you tell us what would be the mood?

    Mr. Harada: It depends on the nature of the cooperation requested. As I stated earlier, if it concerns extradition, we would have to cope with such a request in accordance with our rules and regulations, which do not allow for the extradition of Japanese nationals.

    Related Information (Japan-Peru Relations)
  4. Questions concerning immigration measures

    Q: Some reports in the Japanese media say that the Prime Minister instructed some officials to tighten immigration restrictions in Japan. I wonder if you could explain the purpose of such a decision?

    Mr. Harada: I am not sure whether what you just said is correct or not. You mentioned immigration restrictions; I am not aware of a decision on the immigration policy itself, although the ministries concerned are considering taking stricter measures in relation to passport controls.

    Q: This is in the current situation, as a security measure, to tighten passport controls?

    Mr. Harada: That measure is being taken from a security point of view.

  5. Questions concerning travel advisory warnings

    Q: Japanese citizens fairly well travel where they wish, but since the terrorist attacks in the United States this week, have you issued any travel warnings to any specific countries?

    Mr. Harada: Allow me to check on that.

    Q: On the same question, yesterday you issued a level five travel advisory for travel to Afghanistan. What kind of effect do you foresee for Japanese traveling to the areas around Afghanistan?

    Mr. Harada: That travel advisory warning was issued specifically with regard to Afghanistan. I do not know if we have issued any travel advisory warnings for countries surrounding Afghanistan. Again, let me confirm that.

    Q: It is because there are many tourists going to, for instance, Thailand, Nepal and parts of Europe?

    Mr. Harada: If you are asking about whether or not we have issued a general travel advisory warning--that is not the case. We issue travel advisory warnings for specific countries or areas.

    Q: What is a "level five" warning?

    Mr. Harada: A level five warning is, basically, advice to leave or not to enter the country in question.


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