Press Conference 6 July 2001

  1. Announcement of the Holding of High-level Japan-U.S. Government-to-Government Consultations on Climate Change
  2. Announcement of the visit to Japan by a High-level European Union (EU) Mission on Environment concerning the Kyoto Protocol
  3. Questions concerning the Kyoto Protocol and the High-level Japan-U.S. Government-to-Government Consultations on Climate Change
  4. Question on the visit of Ambassador to Japan Howard Baker of the United States of America concerning the alleged rape of a Japanese woman in Okinawa by a United States service man
  5. Questions related to the alleged rape of a Japanese woman in Okinawa and issues concerning the handling of the suspect

  1. Announcement of the Holding of High-level Japan-U.S. Government-to-Government Consultations on Climate Change

    Deputy Press Secretary Chikahito Harada: Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. I have two announcements to make this afternoon.

    High-level Japan-U.S. Government-to-Government consultations on climate change will be held on 13 July in Washington D.C., as was agreed at the latest Japan-US Summit Meeting.

    The consultations will be attended on the Japanese side by Minister of the Environment Yoriko Kawaguchi, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary for International Economic Affairs/Global Environmental Affairs Kazuo Asakai of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Vice Minister for International Affairs Hidehiro Konno of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry; and on the United States side by Administrator Christie Whitman of the Environmental Protection Agency, Chairman Robert Glenn Hubbard of the Council of Economic Advisors (CEA) and Undersecretary of State for Global Affairs Paula Dobriansky.

    The consultations are to be held on the basis of the discussions on the Kyoto Protocol in the two leaders' meeting, according to the agreement as shown in their communiqué.

    The consultations will be held to enable both countries to explore common ground and areas for common action on climate change.

    Related Information (Japan-The United States Relations)
    Related Information (Climate Change)
  2. Announcement of the visit to Japan by a High-level European Union (EU) Mission on Environment concerning the Kyoto Protocol

    Mr. Harada: A High-level European Union (EU) Mission on Environment concerning the Kyoto Protocol will visit Japan from 9 to 10 July to exchange views with the Government of Japan toward the resumed Sixth Session of the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (COP6).

    The High-level Mission will include Deputy Prime Minister Lena Hjelm-Wallen and Vice Minister of the Prime Minister's Office Lars Danielsson of the Kingdom of Sweden, the EU presidency in the first half of this year; State Secretary for Energy and Sustainable Development Olivier Deleuze of the Kingdom of Belgium, the EU presidency in the latter half of this year, as well as European Commissioner for the Environment Margot Wallström.

    On 9 July, the members of the Mission will pay courtesy calls on Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi and Minister for Foreign Affairs Makiko Tanaka and will also meet with Environment Minister Kawaguchi. On the evening of the same day they will conduct a joint press conference with the Government of Japan.

    Related Information (Japan-EU Relations)
    Related Information (Climate Change)
  3. Questions concerning the Kyoto Protocol and the High-level Japan-U.S. Government-to-Government Consultations on Climate Change

    Q: How long will you talk with the United States to find common ground and when are you going to decide on this matter? For the European Union, COP6 represents some kind of a deadline. They want to begin the process of ratifying after COP6. If Japan wants to ratify, 2002 is not too far away. When can we expect this decision?

    Mr. Harada: Our position is that we would like to see the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol in 2002 with a large number of participants, including the United States. For that purpose, we will exert maximum efforts for the resumed session of COP6.

    Japan hopes the high-level consultation with the United States and the EU Mission will contribute to the resumed session of COP6. We hope that we will be able to obtain positive results as soon as possible and do not have any intention to delay the multilateral consultations.

    Q: Regarding these high-level consultations with the United States, is this the start of a process of long discussion or a one-time consultation?

    Mr. Harada: I do not want to offer conjecture on the result of these consultations, so I cannot say whether it will only be one consultation or a process of consultations. We would like, firstly, to see how far we can proceed at the consultations and based on the results, we will consult within the Government of Japan and then possibly with the United States.

    Related Information (Japan-The United States Relations)
    Related Information (Climate Change)
  4. Question on the visit of Ambassador to Japan Howard Baker of the United States of America concerning the alleged rape of a Japanese woman in Okinawa by a United States serviceman

    Q: Do you have any information about what time Ambassador Baker will be coming to the Foreign Ministry?

    Mr. Harada: I have no information about the exact time. We hope we will get the answer as soon as possible as mentioned by Foreign Minister Tanaka at her press conference this morning. When we get the final response from the United States, Ambassador to Japan Howard Baker of the United States of America will visit Foreign Minister Tanaka and deliver that response.

    Related Information (Japan-The United States Relations)
  5. Questions related to the alleged rape of a Japanese woman in Okinawa and issues concerning the handling of the suspect

    Q: Why do you think the United States is so keen on having an interpreter from the United States side, and not the Japanese interpreter?

    Mr. Harada: I do not want to go into details. We are aware that the United States Government has interest in the fair and humanitarian treatment of the suspect. From our side, we believe it is only natural that suspects generally should enjoy such fair and humanitarian treatment.

    Q: Does this mean that the U.S. does not trust the Japanese authorities in according humanitarian treatment?

    Mr. Harada: I am a spokesman for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, so I think I would have to refer you to United States side.

    There are different criminal procedural systems in Japan and the United States, and maybe from that point of view they are interested in the fair and humanitarian treatment of the suspect. However, I would not say that the United States Government does not have trust regarding our treatment of the suspect.

    Q: Are there no joint patrols or security guards near American military instillations in Okinawa?

    Mr. Harada: I am afraid that I do not have concrete information related to this case. Let me check.

    Related Information (Japan-The United States Relations)

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